Brighton Festival Everyday Epic Short Story Anthology publishes today

We are delighted to announce the publication of the Brighton Festival and nabokov theatre Everyday Epic Short Story Anthology which published today.

Over the month of May 2017 people from diverse walks of life came together to form the Storytelling Army. Throughout the Brighton Festival the army told their individual, and sometimes very painful, stories across Brighton. The Anthology brings together all those stories into one book. Combined with these stories are four short stories from the lucky winners of the Everyday Epic Writing competition which we ran in conjunction with the Storytelling Army.  You can read more about the lucky winners in these blog pages.

This was an amazing project and the first of its kind worldwide. You can read these amazing tales of how everyday people handled or overcame their own ‘everyday epic’.

You can purchase copies of this fantastic book at
http://www.lulu.com/…/every…/paperback/product-23543811.html

Lulu and Writing Magazine’s adult novel competition winner announced

Lulu.com teamed up with Writing Magazine at the end of  2017 to run an adult novel writing competition with the winner receiving  a complete publishing package, including marketing and promotion.

We were looking for a previously unpublished novel manuscript which has obvious mass appeal and deserves to reach a wider audience.

Continue reading “Lulu and Writing Magazine’s adult novel competition winner announced”

Tales from the Toy Cupboard written by Darren Bane and illustrated by Fiona Mitchell – five fabulous signed copies to give-away in time for Christmas!

product_thumbnailLuluUK has teamed up with Lulu author Darren Bane and illustrator Fiona Mitchell to give you a chance to win a printed signed copy (we have 5 to give-away!) of their fabulous children’s book Tales from the Toy Cupboard. Fans of Winnie the Pooh style stories (and all things ‘Teddy’) will love this book. The book is suitable for reading age 8+ and snuggle up reading aloud with adults age 4+. This is a great gift for Christmas.

Continue reading “Tales from the Toy Cupboard written by Darren Bane and illustrated by Fiona Mitchell – five fabulous signed copies to give-away in time for Christmas!”

Lulu sponsors Reader’s Digest 100 word short story competition

rd-logoLulu.com is delighted to have joined forces with Reader’s Digest to support this annual prestigious 100 word writing competition. For the first time in the history of this competition the winners and the runner-ups will be published in a special anthology, meaning even more people will have the opportunity to read the winning stories.

Reader’s Digest will also be giving the authors of the winning stories the chance to write longer versions of their entries to be showcased in the book, due to go on sale in 2018.

In addition, the winner of the adult category will receive £1,000 cash and two runner ups will receive £250 each. There is also additional goodies to win for the 12 and under 12 winners.

Competition details and how to enter can be found at  readersdigest.co.uk/100-word-story-competition  and all entries must be submitted by 5pm on February 19.

100-wd-story

Lulu launches novel writing competition with Writing Magazine – your chance to win a publishing deal

Lulu.com has teamed up with Writing Magazine to offer a complete publishing package, including marketing and PR, to one lucky reader.

The prize includes:
• copy edit
• cover design
• full interior layout and design
• set of proofs
• 10 author copies of the finished book
• ISBN
• marketing to trade and media
• distribution to the book trade for at least a year

We’re looking for a previously unpublished novel manuscript, in any genre, but which we feel has obvious mass appeal and deserves to reach a wider audience.

Lulu.com will publish the winning book in 2018, with cover design, marketing and PR support..

To find out more about the competition and how to enter visit the Writing Magazine website or click here 

Meet the four winners of the Brighton Festival, nabokov and Lulu.com ‘Everyday Epic’ short story writing competition – Beki Turner

Together We Can by Beki Turner

Beckiturner

I live in Brighton with my daughter Rosie and my dog Frankie, and I have been here since 1999, moving impulsively from London after ending up at a party in the basement of a record shop.

Brighton is a very special and magical place, and it felt right to base my story here. I wanted to highlight the subject of loneliness, and how people of all ages can be isolated and lonely for a number of reasons. I’ve worked extensively with homeless individuals and quite vulnerable adults over the years.

Everyone has a reason for ending up in Brighton, and sometimes people get lost along the way.  I wanted to show how kindness and coincidence can bring people together and change lives, and how people coming together can be really powerful.

Perhaps the characters in my story will be developed in the future because they all have a story to tell and have the potential to help each other.

I have always loved writing fiction as a hobby and promised myself that if I was one of the winners of the competition, I’d start taking it seriously…

Extract from Together We Can

Gav is drunk. You can see it in his ordinarily militant body; His usual brash march is more of a meaningful flounder as he meanders across the pebbles. Gav opts for an unnecessarily loud exit from the blaring serenity of Brighton beach, striding past the bank holiday families with their middle class picnics, and the hipsters with their disposable barbeques bought with their disposable incomes. They are all being circled and Gav ruffles the seagulls’ feathers as he strides noisily past them.

Tourists and locals huddle around tables, drinking premium beer from flimsy cups as the sun starts to set. Gav turns back to look at the glitter bomb ocean. The sky is as beautiful as a Bierstadt. Gav breathes in the wafts of charred meat, cigarette smoke, aftershave and salt. He listens to the voices shouting over the deafening base lines and the sirens overhead. He pulls his last can of lager out of his pocket. It’s still perfectly cold. He holds the can for a moment, feeling it penetrate his hands and enjoying the sensation. He cracks it open and takes a swig. The beer simmers in his mouth and the taste is wondrous. And at that exact moment, Gav knows it’s a good time to die.

Meet the four winners of the Brighton Festival, nabokov and Lulu.com ‘Everyday Epic’ short story writing competition – David Benedictus

Protected Housing by David Benedictus 

DavidbenedictusI am 79 and I am a theatre director and writer. I have written lots of stuff – too much really – and published about 15-20 novels from The Fourth of June (1962), a scurrilous book about Eton, to Return to the Hundred Acre Wood (2009) an authorised sequel to the Winnie-the-Pooh books.

I am a member of Nightwriters, the writers club in Brighton. My second published novel, You’re a Big Boy Now (1963) was filmed by the (very) young Francis Ford Coppola in New York. I worked for the BBC on many occasions and was commissioning editor for drama series at Channel 4 from 1984-1986. I was a London tour guide and ran a horse-race tipping service for 25 years. The Daily Mail said I was going to marry Princess Anne , but I didn’t. At the BBC I initiated the programme Something Understood.

I have 4 children, a QC, a novelist, a psychotherapist and a theatrical producer. They are amazing. I have also written a number of musicals, one of which was started in 1955 and is still awaiting a full production

I don’t know where the idea for Protected Housing came from but with just a few hours to go before the deadline I thought I ought to do something  and this is what emerged. It’s not like anything I have written before and although it would benefit from a second draft I like its poignant atmosphere.

You can read more about David’s life  here

Extract from Protected Housing

‘It really was the most marvellous garden,’ she said. ’Not that I had anything to compare it with.’

He tried to recall it. ‘It smelled so beautiful. No chemicals of course then, and it rained only when you needed it. I remember a tree,’ he said. ‘Because I used to sit in the shade and make up names for things. Then you came along, and you thought of miraculous names. Like Flutterby.’

‘You improved on that one.’ She smiled. Although her skin was so wrinkled these days, she retained a smile to charm the birds out of the trees. They seldom spoke of those days because they seemed not only to belong to a different age but to two different people entirely.

‘Would you like to go back?’

‘Well, we couldn’t, could we? For one thing, we’d never find it.’

Meet the four winners of the Brighton Festival, nabokov and Lulu.com ‘Everyday Epic’ short story writing competition – Saba Sams

Nice Light by Saba Sams

sabasampicture

Saba Sams just graduated from the University of Manchester with a first class degree in English Literature with Creative Writing. She has now moved back to Brighton, where she was raised. ‘Nice Light’ is her second short story to be published. The first, ‘What Do You Know About Love?’, can be read online at Forge Literary Magazine. A few of Saba’s poems have also appeared in places such as Ink, Sweat and Tears, and Cluny MCR.

Nice Light’ was written in Manchester, on an evening spent missing those hot Brighton summers, when drunks stumble up the Old Steine, and teenagers crowd the cycle paths on the seafront. It’s a story about right now, about living in the present tense, told by a protagonist who can do nothing but cross each bridge as she gets to it. But this story is also about those tiny moments of self-reflection, those glimmers of memory, recognition, or random kindnesses that remind us who we are, or where we’re going. It’s about that time of day when the clouds split to let a little sun through, and a few minutes of nice light remind us that the ordinary can hold something extraordinary.

Extract from Nice Light

One of those days in Brighton where the heat is thick. Everybody lying on the grass watching everybody else. Ice lolly sticks all over the playground. Dogs with their tongues out, dry. Max sleeping next to a crate of Foster’s. No clouds. A teenage boy in a grey t-shirt tapping me on the shoulder. Sweat patches, smiley. Tells me he’s looking for alcoholics. Making a short film for college. Just thought he’d ask around the park. Hot day, you know? Writes his mobile number on a rizla. Don’t have to decide now, just something to keep in mind. He’d appreciate it.

Put the rizla in my back pocket. Remember being seventeen, on a bus. Woman with a sandwich turned around in her seat to tell me to go easy on the drink. She’d seen me on this route before. Couldn’t even walk straight at eleven in the morning. Better kick it before it’s too late. Got a whole life ahead of me. Not a thing to waste, a life. I thanked her for the advice and got off at the next stop to buy four K Ciders. Guess I’ve got it written all over my face.

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑