Meyrick left Cathy to live with me. They got a divorce, even though she didn’t want it, and we were married immediately. Five months later he was dead. His death was quick, and strange: even the doctor didn’t know why he had died. There were several causes listed on the birth certificate: organ failure, oedema, pneumonia – but they all seemed unlikely. He wasn’t a young man, but he hadn’t been unhealthy. However, at the inquest the coroner accepted that he’d died from natural causes.

At the time of his death, no settlement with Cathy had been agreed. Meyrick was financially astute and employed excellent lawyers and accountants. Almost as soon as we met he began to salt money into various bank accounts for me, some of them offshore. He knew it had always been my ambition to run my own business, and said he was determined not to let Cathy stand in my way.

There was a will: it split his assets equally between Cathy and me. My lawyer said that this was fair; Cathy’s lawyer disagreed because of the surprising smallness of the estate, claiming much more money must be concealed somewhere. Meyrick’s accountants blamed the modesty of the inheritance on some unwise business ventures. Cathy contested the will, but her appeal failed.

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